Posts tagged ‘Interview’

September 1, 2011

Video | Oprah interviews Ralph Lauren and Checks Out his Teepees

by Accidental Bear

Does Ralph Lauren‘s family always dress like cowboys, or just for interviews with Oprah? This rare interview is fascinating and odd.

 

 

 

July 22, 2011

Actor Michael Cyril Creighton from the Web Sitcom Jack in a Box, is 1 Cup Uproarious, A Dash Smarts & A Splash of Sass: Interview

by Accidental Bear

 

This Jack in a Box is FDA approved. Michael Cyril Creighton who plays Jack in the web sitcom, harnesses the powerful health benefits of laughter and humor, and squeezes them into bite size videos. I insist on calling Micheal Creighton, Doctor, seeing that laughter studies so far have shown that laughter can help relieve pain, bring greater joy, and even increase immunity. Michael’s has extensive acting career under his belt; find details here. No, not dirty pics, his impressive resume.

READ INTERVIEW AFTER THE JUMP

July 12, 2011

Accidental Bear Interviews the Men from FridayNight Furlosophy from Australia: Video

by Accidental Bear

We are very excited to kick off our new series called Interviews on a Budget: no frills, no fancy drink with umbrellas, just jam-packed chit-chat. Jason and Malcolm from FridayNight Furlosophy were the perfect way to “get the party started.” These two adorable Australian Bear homosexual  Homo sapiens are playful and spicy, or maybe that’s the beer talking. As proof that three heads are better than one, check out what we came up with.

www.fridaynightfurlosophy.com

Follow FridayNight Furlosophy on FACEBOOK

June 6, 2011

Singer, Song Writer Eric Himan Tells Me Why “You First” | Interview with Accidental Bear

by Accidental Bear
Look what I caught in my dream catcher, Eric Himan. While watching his stellar performance at the El Rio here in San Francisco last month I got pulled into a story he told during his introduction for his new song “You First”. He puts into words something that I have scratch my head over before but was not able to but into a coherent sentence. I have  followed Eric’s career blossom for years now and always impressed by his laid back (charming) demeanor and how approachable he is, no pretension. He breathes passion into his music and gives you an inside look at his personal thoughts. I say, Eric “Thanks for sharing!” I catch up with Eric and cover a large variety of topics; puppies, pride, tornadoes, new album, secrets and being happily partnered. Happy reading, thanks for taking the time to play with us here at Accidental Bear Eric.
 “I started writing music and lyrics because I felt that no one was telling my story with their music. I have had the opportunity to speak my thoughts and I think that is the most vulnerable thing in life you can do. You can tell people what you like and don’t like but when you let them into how you think and why, you share yourself in a major way. I am lucky to be a part of many friendships and can’t wait to see what is next in store.” – Eric Himan

Q & A:

A B: Ok, let’s start with a warm up question. What does pride mean to you? You can attach gay to the front of it or just leave it alone as all-encompassing pride.

Eric Himan: To me, Pride (gay or otherwise) is about celebrating being a part of a community. In a way, I feel it is a gift to have a commonality with a group of people like the LGBT community. Pride celebrations are a way to show the numbers that are out there to those who didn’t think there were that many of us:).

A B: You are coming back from a break? What did you keep yourself busy with on our down time? Day dreaming? Wii, writing a novel, eating potato chips?

Eric: I did have some downtime but I am a one man army when it comes to my career, so that time was spent booking, doing publicity, working radio, and filming parts for a music video (for “Dust”!). When I am not doing all that, I like to sleep and spend time with my 4-year-old doggie, Duncan, and my brand new puppy, 6 month old, Buster. Potato Chips are my weakness though.

A B: Are you constantly writing songs in your head unintentionally? 

Eric: I am. I feel my best songwriting happens when I am not trying to write or push myself into writing. Those are the moments I run to the piano/computer/pen and paper to get it out of my head. 

A B: You are just wrapping up your tour with Namoli Brennet. What was a highlight of the tour or something unbelievable that happened, good or bad?

Eric: The highlight was definitely being able to share the stage with my friend, Namoli. I am such an admirer of hers and getting to sing and play with her every night of the tour was a treat. The hardest part was being away from my family when the tornadoes came through Tulsa and I wasn’t there with my family. I am def not a fan of living in Tulsa because of the tornadoes, but not knowing how they were doing during it, scared me.

A B:  I am very interested in your, “You First” song and the message that backs it. As one that may step back and prays someone else goes first. It is really point of view I have never heard discussed. Tell me about the concept behind You First

Eric: I wrote You First on an airplane Martin Luther King Jr. weekend. I was flying to Tucson to finish recording my new cd with Namoli (whose studio is in Tucson) and it was the week after Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot at a Safeway not too far from where we were going to record. I was also listening to Arlo Guthrie on a CD talk about his father, the amazing Woody Guthrie. He said, “there is a price to be paid for being a leader”. I felt all these things come together and decided right then and there on the plane to spill it out. The message was to say that when you stand up to make you voice heard, you also make yourself a target. Many times, we tend to stay on the sideline waiting for some leader to stand up when we possess that power ourselves. I make myself a target, but sometimes standing up for what you believe is more important.

A B: What does your summer looks like? Playing any festivals that I should drive a 1,000 miles or so to see?

Eric: I am all over the place (right now I am writing this from Kitchener, Ontario up in Canada where I play Kitchener’s tri-Pride tomorrow). I will be in Columbus, OH, Albuquerque, NM, the Outer Banks, NC, then in July over to the northeast with shows in PA, NYC, and MA. August has me in Chicago for North Halsted Market Days. Booking some dates also in the midwest then too. If you were to drive, I would head to the Chicago show. I will have a four piece rock band with me ready to make some noise on the streets of Chi-town.

A B: On your new album you have brought in the mastering talents of Chris Bellman (Ani DiFranco, Alanis Morissette, Elton John). You totally hold your own in that group. Have you worked with Chris Bellman in the past? 

Eric: This was the first time working with Chris and he did an amazing job. He has mastered many of my favorite, influential albums and having him work on my disc, was extra special.  

A B:  What would your response be if someone called you a sex symbol?

Eric: I def. appreciate the compliment when it comes up but I honestly don’t know what to do with that. I never seek out that kind of attention and sometimes surprised when it comes up.  I think if I thought about it too much, I would get even shyer than I can be already. 

A B: As a kid did you have positive role models? How do they differ from your role models of today?

Eric: I think my role models growing up were a lot of strong women. I lost my mother at a very young age and I think that might have something to do with that. Positive role models growing up were women like Ani DiFranco, Patty Griffin, and Janis Joplin. As I’ve gotten older my role models have become my grandmother Grace, my partner, and my close friends. I’ve learned so much from those surrounding me.  I am lucky to have them in my life to take after:).

A B: You are happily partnered and 2 dogs (right?) Your thoughts on gay marriage, gay adoption and the term civil union opposed to married.

Eric: I am very happily partnered and definitely want the full benefits of marriage (including a proper wedding!). Gay adoption has to be the biggest hot button for me because I can’t understand why some children are denied parents who will love them and want them. Civil unions are a great start, but if we are going to start the conversation of gay marriage, let’s not just talk about it during election years.

A B: Anybody you would love to share the stage with or record with?

Eric: There are SOOO many people I would love to record with/share the stage. There is something about Natalie Merchant and her music that makes me want to nominate her first! Of course, Ani DiFranco, Beth Hart, and Sia would be fun to work with.

A B: So, gay pride month is just around the corner. Will you be parading around the streets wrapped in nothing but a gay flag?

Eric: I am a tad bit more subtle than that.ha. I am happy to represent my brand of music at the festivals.

A B: Tell, me where you hope this next album takes you?

Eric: I hope this next album opens up more opportunities for me to tour to places I haven’t played yet, building up the audiences I already (and thankfully!) have in many cities, travel to Europe to tour, and have a chance to fulfill my dream of working with those I admire (which I already have done working with Namoli).

A B: Tell me (us) an Eric Himan original secret or confession.

Eric: I wanted to go to puppetry school and be an actor when I was younger. I always had an interest in doing them but never the right time to try.

A B: In the next year what should we expect from you?

Eric: You should expect to hear some of the songs from the new CD on the radio, in TV, and movies. I will also be releasing a live DVD from my Tulsa CD Release Party concert (with a string quartet!!). 

More on Eric:

CATCH HIM IF YOU CAN!

June 1, 2011

Queerty Reels in a Big Catch: Interview With Jake Shears & Armistead Maupin About ‘Tales Of The City’

by Accidental Bear

From http://Queerty.com: An interview with Jake Shears & Armistead Maupin about their new musical based on the Tales of the City novels. Jake Shears & Armistead Maupin talk about coming from different generations and how they collaborated on ‘Tales Of The City’. They have “cute” chemistry during the interview, defining terms from their own generations for the other. Great job Queerty!

April 13, 2011

My Chat with Cazwell is a Hot Potato; Interview

by Accidental Bear

My interview with Cazwell is like a hot potato- I cannot hold it any longer. This shit is too good. We touched base on his upcoming album, collaboration with Peaches, Amanda Lepore and his dad’s love of air instruments. You will be proud of me , I held back from any skin flute jokes. The interview was via the telephone. As we exchanged words, I could hear, in the background, New York City breathing; car alarms and the hustle and bustle of the side walks. Our conversation had a relaxed vibe of 2 friends on a walk through the city, gossiping and talking about life, the good , the bad and the ugly. I did my usual, talked Cazwell’s ear off until his phone battery went dead. Here is how things went down.

January 25, 2011

Tom Ford, Heterophobic

by Accidental Bear
Tom Ford

Image via Wikipedia

Just because you are queer as a $2 bill doesn’t mean you have good taste, can design yourself out of a K-hole or superior in the garment world, but Tom Ford says so. Lets think about this. I mean, we (queers) are light in our loafers, ANAL about detail and sensitive to the color blind ( I can pull anything out of my ass), right? But to DEBUNK this idea of Toms, take a stroll through San Franciscos Castro District or down Christopher Street in  New York and you will see (CODE RED) total fashion disasters. Hello, gay brother the 90′s wants its style back and the 80s is sadly missing its hair ( but not in a ironic way).

Tom Ford: Gay Designers Are Superior

By Advocate.com Editors

TOM FORD X390 (GETTY) | ADVOCATE.COM

Never one to give a boring interview, Tom Ford recently explained toInterview magazine why gay men are superior in the world of high fashion.

“I think I detach the physical from the spiritual. It’s my business to make a woman or a man beautiful, and I’m working with a model in a fitting, and I’ve objectified them to the point that they become an object,” Ford told artist John Currin, whose wife, Rachel Feinstein, recently modeled in an intimate show of Tom Ford’s return to women’s wear design.

“They’re something that I’m modeling or shaping or sculpting, but I’m very aware that even though I make them physically beautiful, their soul and personality and character is somewhat detached from that,” Ford said. “It’s great when you have a combination of the two — that’s what makes a true beauty. Some people are physically beautiful but yet they’re completely uninteresting, and thus they’re not beautiful. I detach the two. … That’s why I think gay men make better designers.”

Read the interview here.

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