Posts tagged ‘Firestorm (comics)’

July 28, 2011

Interview: Artist Ed Luce Schools Me on his Comic The Wuvable Oaf

by Accidental Bear

Ed Luce the artist and writer of the luvable Wuvable Oaf comics just schooled me in The Wuvable Oaf’s history and was patient to give me a crash course in Wuvable Oaf 101. Now I will be abundantly ready to rub elbows with and chuckle about good ole’ issues #1 & #2 with Wuvable Oaf super fans tomorrow night at the release party for issue #3 in San Francisco’s Mission District. In anticipation I will have the Pointer Sister’s hit “I’m so Excited” on repeat for the next 24 hours.

Ed Luce’s first comic book project, Wuvable Oaf is a “fairy” tale chronicling one big, scary lookin’ dude’s search for cute little “mans” in a city that looks suspiciously like San Francisco.

The Oaf has also made appearances in the UK’s Gay Times Magazine, Italy’s PISSZINEInstinct MagazineWhite Crane Journal, Prism Comics 2008 Guideand on the chests of hunky dudes n’ sassy ladies all over the world, in the form of his very own t-shirts.

While currently pouring his energy into the comics world, Ed also leaves a lengthy trail of art debris behind him, including recent published features in Bearflavouredartists’ catalog and LA gay men’s health magazine Corpus. His paintings have been exhibited in galleries, museums, store windows and bathrooms from San Diego to Buffalo to Paris. http://www.wuvableoaf.com

San Francisco Wuvable Oaf #3 Release Party!  

Friday, July 29th from 7-9 PM
Goteblüd, 766 Valencia Street, San Francisco, CA 94110
Signing and Wuvable Oaf Art Exhibition Reception with Ed
plus the debut of a new “Wuvable Oaf” print!

Accidental Bear’s Mike Enders & The Wuvable Oaf creator Ed Luce bear-rake it down for you (Get it? Break it down? Oh, just read the damn interview):

Accidental Bear: Wuvable Oaf is such a  cuddly name. Was that the intention behind naming him that?

Ed Luce: Wow…after three years of comics and shirts, no one has ever asked me that!  Well, at first it was just meant as a commentary on the character’s speech pattern, which I imagined to be mildly baby talkish.  In a deep bass tone, of course.  But as the comic evolved, it also made sense as a unique name, easily searchable on the web.

A B: Where was your energy going to before the creation on the Oaf?

Ed: I was a painter for nearly ten years before the Oaf was ever born.  In some ways, he’s an extension of that work, in a different format and genre.   My work was already very cartoony, using bits and pieces from Popeye, Sluggo of Nancy, He-man and G.I. Joe in a sort of smorgasbord of hyper-masculinity.  The Oaf sprung directly out of that soup, moving from the canvas to the page pretty effortlessly.

A B: The release for Wuvable Oaf is this Friday the 29th. How old is the Oaf since you first put him on paper?

Ed: The first time the character appeared with that name above his head was in a paper doll design I did for a theme show at the Trunk Space Gallery in Phoenix.  I believe it was fall of 2006, so he’ll technically be five years old this fall!   The shirt appeared one year later, followed by the first comic in the summer of 2008.

A B: Could you give a quick rundown of what someone might expect if they are picking up The Wuvable oaf for the first time?

Ed: I’ve toyed around with many descriptions over the years…none of which ever really work for me.  Lately, I’ve been calling it “the gay comic for everyone else”, somewhat jokingly.  I feel it’s from an undeniably queer perspective but is written and constructed to be all-inclusive.  I don’t shy away from the gay, anyone that has ever seen the book can testify to that.  But I try to speak in terms, both visually and textually, that don’t alienate any one group from appreciating the narrative.  I feel I achieve that easily enough with an absence of explicit sex scenes.  It’s important to me that hetero folks identify with the Oaf and his pals too, and I think boners don’t always work well in that capacity.  But otherwise, it’s ostensibly a love story, about someone who thinks he’s impossible to love.

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