Posts tagged ‘Mental Health’

September 4, 2011

National Suicide Prevention Week Sept 4 – 10: The Trevor Project “Talk To Me,” Campaign

by Accidental Bear

During National Suicide Prevention Week, join Kevin McHale and The Trevor Project for “Talk To Me,” a campaign for conversation. Visit our website to learn how you can participate.

And remember: If you or someone you know ever needs help, please call The Trevor Lifeline at 866-488-7386. It’s free, confidential and available 24/7. Or visit http://www.TheTrevorProject.org.

And remember: If you or someone you know ever needs help, please call The Trevor Lifeline at 866-488-7386. It’s free, confidential and available 24/7. Or visit http://www.TheTrevorProject.org.

http://www.twitter.com/trevorproject
http://www.facebook.com/thetrevorproject
http://thetrevorproject.tumblr.com
http://www.youtube.com/trevorprojectmedia

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June 8, 2011

“As We Live It” City Hall SF CA

by Accidental Bear

This Is How We Do It

By Tara Jepsen via www.sfweekly.com

San Francisco produces such a wealth of so-called outsider art, you could quickly lose interest in who the hell the insiders are. Tonight’s opening for “As We Live It”features participants in our great city’s assistance programs, including housing, mental health, and substance abuse treatment. Using the loose theme of expressing their identities, the artists splash their interior onto the exterior via drawing and other media. Thirty-three artists exhibit in the show, with four featured, whose works include an interview conducted by San Francisco Study Center staffer and exhibit juror Heidi Swillinger. S.F. artists occasionally hit some sort of big time — Margaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee — but most are of the lesser-known and highly original variety (such as those from local-treasure org Creativity Explored, for example). San Francisco is a complicated story to tell: interior, exterior, assisted, substance-abused, inside, outside, or big-time — we always want more of this story, and that is most certainly available tonight.

The opening reception for “As We Live It” starts at 5:30 p.m.

Daily from Wed., June 8 until Fri., September 9

March 3, 2011

Yes I Can’t; Tell Kids the truth.

by Accidental Bear

Telling a child that he/she can do anything they set they’re mind to is a flat out lie and setting children up for life long frustration and sense of not living up to your expectations or their abilities. Have we forgotten about genetics? This is a simple factor that plays into what you can and cannot do. I for instance know my short comings and do have the capacity to be the President of the USA. Be glad for that. Although growing up, I was told that if I wanted to , I could be president. Sweet grown up, but liars. Do you think kids know you are lying as they are telling you this BS? I think so.

You can be the best you can by giving “it” your all, sure. My father raised me and my siblings with the tone of a used car saleman. He coached us with pep talks. Layered on the BS to build our self-esteem, but only set us up to feel like failures every time we didn’t come in first place, or get a job and meet the right “girl”. I swam  and dove on local swim  team while growing up and always came in second and third but never first. I would wonder why I sucked so bad , because , I was told I could come in first at what ever I tried. And I tried my darndest and 2nd and 3rd was my best.

Do you think a child dealing with the fact that they may be gay believes that if they try hard enough they can be straight?

This must carry on into adult hood. Be anything you want, as long as you set your mind to it ; FALSE. I want to have an awesome swimmers build with 6% body fat and win karaoke comepetions , but I sound like a squeaky care tire needing more air and genetics have made me hairy from head to toe and at whatever weight I am, have a little tire around the middle ( thanks dad, be all I can be).

So, we are set up for mental failure and low self esteem by the good intention of our parents. Actually I believe its the laziness of our parents not being creative enough to give us the truth and make the truth of not BEING #1 at anything you want it normal and OK. If we don’t change this glamorized way of thinking our  your kids will be set up never being able to reach their expectations of themselves, because they will be reaching to high. I say reach for the lowest star. He you achieve it awesome, if not you wont be beating yourself over the head.